Horticulturists LIVE! Ep. 21

Horticulturists LIVE! Ep. 21

Articles, Blog , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 Comments


hello everyone welcome to Facebook live
with me horticulturist we are the horticulturist here to answer your
gardening questions and just talk about what’s going on out in the garden this
time of year my name is Candace Hart I’m the Illinois State Master Gardener
specialist based here in central Illinois and I love to grow flowers
that’s kind of my my gardening thing annuals perennials anything flowering
that’s that’s my go to my colleagues here you want to introduce yourself tell
us what you like to garden with yeah my name is Kelly Allsup and I am a
horticulture educator based out of Bloomington but I serve Livingston and
Woodford counties also my expertise lies with insects pollinators and so then I
also love to dabble in vegetable gardening like Ryan does horticulture
educator out of Champaign my specialty is probably woody plants
you know trees and shrubs and all those kind of things but like Kelly I also
like to grow some vegetables I also really like just all the native plants
that’s kind of my my favorite niche cool very cool
so as this is our last show of the year we’re gonna try putting up a pole today
and I’ll mention this a couple times to try to get some of your guys’s feedback
on what you want us to talk about cuz we love doing this we love answering your
questions but we also want to do stuff that you guys want to see or you guys
want to hear about so keep an eye out we’re gonna post a poll today and we
love your feedback on those topics but we’ve got a couple demos planned today
if you have gardening questions start to add those into the comment box but I
think Kelly’s gonna kick us off we’ll talk about some evergreen containers
things you can do this time of year yeah so if you’re like me your outdoor pots
have all died back and you have some pretty brown and black looking annuals
so what I do normally is pull those out use that soil and then I’ll put a little
sand on top I’m not putting sand on this just because I didn’t have any on hand
and but the sand actually helps the water because even though you’re
having air for greens outside and it’s cold they still want to have a little
bit of water and they’re still living so I just wanted to show you just really
simple design so I went to a local garden center and I just picked up some
stems of different evergreens so I started with some Fraser Fir which is a
little bit cheaper option and I’m going to you know populate most of the greens
arrangement with those I picked up some junipers with the blueberries and some
oxford cedar now what is gonna make this it’s a simple design what’s gonna make
it special is the mix of the three greens it’s gonna make it look really
high-end see Candice degrees like that she’s the expert so I am the one that I
will confer with Candice this whole time so uh you know floral design can be
somewhat intimidating to people but here I’m gonna show you just a few steps I am
NOT an expert floral designer or even you know the best floral designer but
just following it you’re good so Candace is gonna cut me off a little piece of
wire and what I’m going to do is I am going to place my first pieces my first
and my first pieces first these pieces are going to determine the height of my
arrangement so what I’m gonna do is I’m going to place two rather tall pieces
back to back in my arrangement so but what are they doing they’re kind of like
goal posting it which is where a little piece of wire comes in so I’m going to
take a little piece of green wire this is just a floral wire that Candice gets
at craft stores sell in in the floral section so I’m going to tie these
together and this is the most complicated part of the
arrangement there we go well that’s not too complicated there we go so I had
nowhere of my height I’m not gonna go above this another thing that I do is
I’m gonna pick up this and Candice is gonna show my little trusty cardboard
cutout because what this does is it enables me to go like this and turn it
because it’s going to be an all-around arrangement so now I’m gonna start to
build the shape so I’m just gonna grab some of these pieces right here and I’m
going to build my shape so even though I might have pieces that aren’t the
prettiest they’re going to ultimately look good when they’re all mixed in so
notice I put there there’s a piece right there so there you go I’m already
starting to build my shape I’m going to turn and I’m going to put another piece
right there again building my shape so that that’s just potting soil it is but
sometimes I put the like right here I’m gonna put one piece right here like
right up against it oh it’s already filling out you see that I’m gonna keep
turning and keep filling it out I’m gonna use as many even if I have a
little cut end I’m still going to use it because ultimately those cut ends are
going to be cut off are going to be covered up by other stuff so if I have a
lower piece I’m gonna maybe put it more towards the edge if I have a longer
piece now I’ve already pre-cut these pieces so just to make it a little
easier for demonstration so while I finish filling in this ryan is going to
give you a few tips on how to grow some of this and harvest some of this in your
own landscape yeah I get that question a lot from folks this time of year you
know how much can I prune off my evergreen shrub to use for wreath
cuttings and the answer is not that different than what we would normally
prune in a given pruning session and you can fruit about a third of that foliage
safely on a healthy plant without impacting plant health but there is a
little bit of a trick to it you can’t just prune the whole side of a plan to
offer it’s gonna look unbalanced so just like a normal printing operation you
would want to kind of spread those cuts out over the over the plant so it’s
gonna take a few minutes a few minutes longer than just whacking off a few
limbs but you can safely prune about 1/3 one of the plants in my er that I
regularly use for this is arborvitaes we have some small arborvitaes shrubs the
last couple of years I’ve got a quite a bit out of for wreath cutting you know
another one that’s great in our area is white pine it’s got a little bit longer
more feathery of a needle where arborvitaes is gonna look very similar
to the junipers they’re you know a flattened spray of a needle as opposed
to then spruce and and and fir have shorter needles like this so by varying
some of those you know different needle characteristics you can add some
interest as well you know blue spruce is a commonly grown evergreen and in
concolor fir is kind of a similar evergreen that’s maybe does a little
better in our area so that’s kind of a variety of some of the main ones I
didn’t mention you yeah it’s really the only time of year that I prune my you
because I might as well use it if I’m gonna prune em as well put it to good
use so I tend to use the U as like the base for all my window boxes containers
yeah plants and actually it looks pretty similar to the foliage yeah tonight’s
dark green yeah and I think everybody can probably find it you so yeah so
maybe say that save your winter pruning tips or your time you’re printing for
winter it’s better for playing health and then any of this greenery you could
use for making a wreath or making that an arrangement like Kelly’s doing here
so peace doesn’t work for me so that’s the technique when a piece doesn’t go
the right direction you just throw it behind you
this is really filling in it is really filling and he’s starting to really show
that you know if I just fill out my shape first then its image and what did
I do all I did was I did my top piece I said
I’m gonna go like that and I just started turning and if the
foliage doesn’t face the right way you just keep turning it until it faces the
weight we’re going to throw it over Ryan’s head and you say this piece is
not going to be you know one question I’ve got is what can I do for maybe a
more sustainable Christmas tree option and one of the things that my family has
done is we use it an indoor house plant Norfolk Island Plus pine is our
Christmas tree every year and so we kind of set it up high a little higher than
it the pot would just sit on the floor yeah and we’re able to hang ornaments
then off the edge of the pot that I think one of these arrangements would
work wonderfully as a small Christmas tree yeah my Christmas tree this year is
going to be branches tied together in the shape of a Christmas tree with
ribbon that works too because I can’t have a Christmas tree because I have an
11 month so now I’m going to add the cedar and this is when it really starts
to look good so I’m just gonna continue turning and try to add it you know at
intervals every now and then so the first piece is always going to go up
high to make sure that I have it throughout the whole entire arrangement
kind of organized some of these there I’m going to tuck them in and as I go
I’m going to start adding to the sides so kind of organize but kinda random –
but evenly spaced I guess but maybe I think the evenly spaced if mean if you
have all cedar on this side and it’s not throughout this side then it’s not gonna
look quite as high-end so I’m going to add another general kink
right there so it just lends itself well to going over the side of the pot even
though I cut the tip out of this I’m still going to use it I’m just gonna
bury it in the base yeah so making use of that ugly piece floral designers they
you try to use everything so I’m gonna go that’s a little piece I’m gonna make
sure he goes at the base just randomly throughout here we go do we see any
major holes I’m pretty good okay so I’ve definitely left one of the the Juniper
for the last because it really fills in my holes I met you see how beautiful
that junior blue juniper berries in you just mix it up perfect yeah that really
so I’m gonna take one of my taller pieces and maybe fit it in up high fill
in that piece fill in that hole a little bit right well fill it in gotta gotta
get it in the soil or it’s not gonna stay alive it’s just going to go where
it’ll blow out yes a windy day so again I hope he’s here so now I’m gonna maybe
put a piece right here and I’m gonna still continuously turn maybe put a
piece right here continuously turn this one has a cut in I’m not gonna worry
about that because you’ll never see it once it’s tucked in with another piece right here I have a
little bit of a I have a little bit about maybe a hole right here so I think
I’m going to tuck this one in right here and that kind of just really helped that
out that’s a couple more pieces on the side it was very couple more pieces and
they just look so beautiful just hanging off the edge okay so now ultimately I’m
gonna turn it turn it to see if I see any holes
I feel like this did not work out right there just aren’t tall enough so I’m
going to maybe see if I have another piece okay I don’t have another piece
you know what I’m gonna do I’m just going to take this piece out rearrange
it to kind of fill in that hole a little bit and I don’t want to miss out on that
beautiful blueberries so maybe I’ll just let it shine right here okay okay I
think I’m done beautiful you can keep adding and adding and adding so then I
have some beautiful winter berry which Ryan just schooled me on the scientific
name of winterberry sometimes winterberry is difficult because once
it’s harvested what is it what is the same it likes decidua yeah so deciduous
Holly I guess is what I know it is really great plant native has all these
awesome berries in the wintertime and another really cool thing that you can
grow in the landscape yeah yeah so and maybe with the idea that you could prune
in a winter time I’m going to maybe clip that tip off to see if I see that tip
sometimes the nice thing about this is it doesn’t have to be a proper pruning
cut because they haven’t even turned off so I’m just going to go ahead and add
some of those red twigs into my arrangement really adding some color
with that feeling contrasting red with the green flow one thing that I can do
is I don’t really have to use all these chunky ends if I don’t want to I could
cut it in half so I’m gonna use this Chucky end right here except I don’t
want it to look like a goalpost one of my chunky ends as I could do something
like this and even though it’s a cut end I could cut off some of those lower
branches and then maybe it could be kind of tucked in to – you know put those
berries throughout the whole arrangement and not just have them I’m actually
gonna cut this tip off if you have any questions about what Kelly’s do and add
them to the comment box yes Candice even though I’m doing the demonstration
Candice is an expert hardly on this type of work the overwhelming evergreen smell and then obviously the nice thing about
then you’re gonna put this outdoors so those cool temperatures are really gonna
help preserve everything cuz a lot of times when you bring sometimes if you
brought something like this inside or wreath
it won’t stay fresh quite as long because you’re gonna have obviously much
higher temperatures and it’s gonna dry out a lot faster so this can last you
all winter long I leave most of my stuff in my containers and window boxes until
spring when I’m ready to dump out the soil and so did you learn fresh so after
you set this outside then do you water it or do you just a lot of rain all that
rain do it most I usually don’t want and snow ya know
it’s a great way to keep it yeah go and do we see any holes where more red
berries need to go Candice got one sprig left that were you gonna use this now this
particular sample I’ll talk about this for a second this is a red twig dogwood
so in another native shrub that has beautiful red twigs obviously is
deciduous loses its leaves in the wintertime but one that you do have to
work a little bit to maintain the maximum red twig color it’s recommended
that you keep younger to younger stems in the shrubs canopy to keep more of
this red color the older stems start to get a little less red so definitely one
you would need to regularly kind of prune out the older ones unfortunately
don’t work as great for this yeah you could probably use the tips of those
that are a little more red but yeah so so another one that you could actually
add your landscape yeah Megan s where do you get all the
cuttings she missed that part at the beginning so Kelly do you want to share
again where are you I purchased my greens from a local garden center so
they have all these separate stems that you can go and buy by the pound and so I
really it was just like a couple of pounds each of the three different
greens and then I did a bunch of the winter berry just to add that red color
I’m not a big fan of adding like tons of stuff I like to keep it simple and
natural even sometimes I don’t even love the bow but Candice made a really
beautiful bow so even though I purchased I do think that you can like ryan said
grow some of this stuff in the landscape and then harvest it his rule was no more
than a third I mean you don’t want to look like you just went in there and
chopped part of it out so how do you trim back and evergreen without do you
go all the way back to the base well that’s a good question I know a lot of
folks like with you in particular we talked about you before now shear
they’re evergreens so that’s that’s not what I’m talking about necessarily
you’re fearing I’m talking about hand pruning were you I’m not gonna actually
cut anything on this but where you would actually go back into the shrub and cut
off a limb out of branch Union so it it takes a little bit of practice
to kind of evenly distribute that but yeah you want to actually cut at one of
the branch unions on this so not just this is maybe in the middle of the stem
because it was taken as a cutting but and if you find you know if you’re if
you’re trying to prune the shrub and you have something that’s really sticking
out you can kind of just trace this back into the into the center of the plant
and cut it a branch union the plants going to seal over that wound that if
you cut in a branch Union as opposed to just cutting in the middle of stem it’ll
have a little more difficulty you know healing over that wound so that’s that’s
kind of the gist of hand pruning you try and evenly spaced that pruning out
around the canopy of the shrub anytime I prune if there’s any disease dying dead
stems I go ahead and get those out back to the nearest branch Union but it does
take a little bit of practice to kind of get that pruning evenly distributed and
a habit not show you know after some practice it really doesn’t look pruned
when you get done you can tell it yeah and I always keep in mind too you never
want to leave up their stem like if you cut too far back and there’s no green
left on that particular portion most of those evergreens are not gonna leave out
again so if you don’t leave if you don’t leave any green growth if you can’t have
new new growth yeah and that’s there’s some yeah some some technicalities yeah
we’re just just the fact that evergreens don’t have a lot of adventitious buds or
secondary buds they’re in the bark and dormant and we’re ready to sprout after
you prune them Arbor vitaes may be an exception where it has a lot of those
actually you has a lot of dormant buds that will but you know some of the
others like firs Pines spruces they they don’t have a lot of those secondary buds
so they’re not going to so if you prune a stem down to too much it’s really not
gonna root yeah rebound so the last thing I’m gonna do is add a bow I’m you
know there’s always wire left at the bow so you could put it at the base you
could put it you know off to the side it doesn’t really matter whatever you want
but I always tend to leave like you know you have those leftover stem
what I always do is I wrap my wire around the stem and then that makes sure
that the bow won’t fall out and then I’ll just go ahead and put it at the
base so just really simple mixing the greens makes it look really high-end
okay arrangement if you have any questions let me know sorry that wasn’t
so fast but I’m gonna go ahead and put it to the side and let Ryan put it on
the ground to get it out it is heavy okay so we didn’t get that pole going
today but we have asked you in the comments if you have ideas this is our
last show of the year so we’re gonna be planning for 2020 so if you have topics
ideas things you want to hear about things you want to see us a demo
definitely add those into the comments today we already got a suggestion about
invasive species would definitely talk about those for sure so put those
suggestions in the comments and any gardening questions you have going on
now obviously we’re not outside gardening a whole lot this this time of
year I’ve been mostly doing evergreen things for holiday decor for the most
part but we do definitely have plants inside this time of year right so yeah
Brian you brought along a beautiful look in one of the most beautiful plants out
of my collection right now it’s a Thanksgiving cactus we just talked about
this often yeah for the show there’s also Christmas cactus which is a little
less common as I looked at all of all of the cacti I had once I figured out how
to identify the difference it seemed like although all that we have is
Thanksgiving cactus I think we’ve talked about this in the show before that it’s
you know photo period dependent on on flowering so as the days get shorter
that causes this plant to flower this particular plant I actually had under a
light on a timer if not I find that where they’re located in my house I
don’t I don’t get they don’t ever really flower because we have lights on at
night there’s there’s just too much exposure to light and it’s not regular I
don’t really ever have they don’t take direct Sun so I don’t have these in
direct Sun anywhere so where they are kind of off in a corner in places gets
enough indoor light that it tricks the plane into thinking it’s not wintertime
so the solution I found is to put them under a light on a timer or another way
is to put them in a closet at night or give them that dark period that’s that’s
nice and long and probably about six four to six weeks before you want these
two to flower like this I was trying to get this one really in full bloom for
Thanksgiving you can see I’ve missed a little bit you know I have some I have
quite a few blooms left here that haven’t opened up so although it looked
prettier Thanksgiving it wasn’t you know kind of in the full bloom that I had
hoped but this also brings up the point that wintertime is also difficult time
for houseplants you know although it the changes seem subtle in our house inside
there are changes to a lot of the indoor environment and and if you don’t pay
attention I know I’ve lost a lot of houseplants over the winter time it
seems like the time that I’ve lost the most so one of the most important things
is thinking about watering and contrary to what most folks would think over
watering is probably the thing that kills the most house plants over the
winter time and that’s because these plants go into a bit of dormancy they
they aren’t growing as much light levels are lower especially if they’re exposed
to a lot of natural light and so they don’t need quite as much water so what
should we do is just just be a little more careful with watering you know I
can stick my finger in the soil right here and I can feel this is nice and
moist this was just watered over the weekend if it doesn’t feel nice and
moist then it’s probably time to water good rule of thumb is to try and let
that soil really dry out all the way between waterings with a lot of my
plants I can tell by the weight of the pot whether it needs water or not so
that’s something to think about as you’re going around and you can really
get a feel for each plant and how dry it spot its puddle feel I always stick my
finger in the bottom hole in the bottom hole that’s a great idea so all your
thoughts should have a hole pretty wet down there if there’s any
moisture I do not water that plant yeah that’s a great point you’re right the
top could dry out now I have some that you can’t lift off so obviously those
you have to do but probably you’ll probably be slowing down your watering
over the winter time at least that’s how my house usually works now also thinking
about water and moisture humidity is quite a bit lower in your house in the
wintertime most house plants like about 40 or 50 percent humidity indoors at my
house it gets down below 20 percent sometimes cuz we have a wood stove that
we heat with I’ve got a little digital monitor that has records temperature and
humidity that I’ve placed in my house I’ve placed at my office to compare
different environments even in my office just in a standard offer office building
it’s how it’s between 20 and 30 percent humidity in the wintertime so that’s
quite a bit lower certain plants Christmas cactus probably not going to
be impacted too much by that a lot your succulents aren’t going to matter that’s
not gonna matter too much but things that have you know thinner leaves and
are more sensitive to moisture that can impact them what can you do probably the
best thing you can do is either move that plant to a more humid environment
so like a more humid spot at my houses around our kitchen sink with a very
sunny kitchen so I can get them a little closer to the kitchen sink they get a
little better relative humidity in a bathroom near a shower with a sunny
window with enough light or close to a humidifier and probably one of the last
resort things I do is put them on a tray of water yeah now you can’t have the pot
down in the water so a lot of folks use rocks to kind of lift those pots up but
that that water really does evaporate out of the tray
one thing I used to do in the past and I realized doesn’t do much is misting your
plant and unless you’re going to do that five times a day you’re really not gonna
impact humidity and I’ve tested it with my little meter at my office compared to
one plant over here sitting over a tray of water and one here that I missed it 2
or 3 times a day the humidity throughout the day really
it didn’t the the tray the slow release from that tray did more than my misting
could do for that plant so and even though I do this because of the
light because you’re like grouping all these plants in front of the sunniest
window you have grouping plants together really does help too
I mean it’s not as amazing as a humidifier but grouping plants together
yeah that’s a great point that is a factor when all those plants get
together they create their own little micro environment of humidity some of
that even coming from the soil in the pots and everything so you know that’s
that’s a great solution to to kind of cluster them together
you mentioned light light is probably the biggest limiting resource to plant
growth in the wintertime light levels can change in your windows whether you
realize it or not thus the Sun dips a little lower on the horizon and perhaps
something now is blocking some the light coming in that window on that same note
some of your diffused light through a north or east window in the winter time
cannot be enough to keep those plants alive I know I’ve I’ve lost a few
houseplants or the one time I think because that you know what was good
diffuse light in the summertime from a north window is not in the wintertime
also reiterate that form the best windows are well it depends on the plan
but the best windows for diffused light are north and east
the best windows for a full Sun kind of plant are your south and west windows
now I have a tricky West window on my house it during the summertime it’s
pretty diffused light because it’s shaded by a big Norway maple that trees
days are numbered it has a really bad girdling root problem that’s unfixable
so we’re kind of just waiting until it’s health starts but anyway this time of
year that goes from what was like a nice shady window during the summer time to
all the sudden full Sun when that tree loses its leaves so think about that
that your trees outside can impact that light and that can be a change that a
plant can’t handle I guess the biggest thing that you need to think about in
all this is that any changes to a house plants environment or to a for a plant
need to be gradual you can’t have this really stark sharp change so one of
those changes that happens this time of year that can can’t really affect house
plants is just all the heat coming out of the vents now but so that’s different
from in the fall time when we did have really air conditioning or heat for
a while they’re coming out that much now all the sudden that furnace is blowing
it’s you know humid dryer so you can you can dry out a plant over a vent that’s
starting to become more active as as we heat in the wintertime also some of your
windows can have a draft that you may not notice I think that’s really fried
some vegetation on the outside of some of my plants you know so those kind of
things are you know really think about that temperature and where you’re having
a big swing day tonight because most house plants really take a daytime
temperature 65 to 75 degrees in the wintertime is what they prefer because
most of them are tropical yeah but they really don’t like much more than a 10
degree drop at night if you’re starting to swing further than that by a cold
window at night that can really have an effect on them so just a lot of those
those are just a lot of the things that over the years I’ve kind of learned by
trial by air from plants not making it or not looking good midwinter yeah so if
you I guess in conclusion I’m concluding that whole if you your plant starts
looking bad think about the watering the temperature the humidity and the light
and address those four things and maybe your plant will start to look better but
sometimes in the winter my planet can look like a dog all winter long and I’ll
never get it to look good but as soon as spring comes and I put get it outside in
the fresh air and get it perfect light and start watering it and give it a
fertilizer treatment it looks like the most beautiful plant in the world yeah
there’s a lot of mine that I just kind of let him go dormant for the winter
basically and I expect they’re gonna look crummy and you’re right once you
get back out the spring they’re great just kind of limp through the way yeah
just put in the garage under lights cuz I’m just like you’re gonna keep it going
or you can be like me and host a plant propagation class for your master
gardeners and then get rid of 75% of your plants because you know plants will
be coming to your future soon then you don’t need all those
if only we all had agree now I know perfect so Candace gets a greenhouse
friend and I will visit her every fall I got to cut down some maple we do have a
Ryan has a great article on this topic or that we’ve got posted in the comments
so make sure you check out that article if you want some more information
Carroll common and cheese is a water meter or by sticking her finger in to
determine if it needs watering that’s a great way to do it mhm and we’ve had
some other comments and questions coming in here so let’s see what we have couple
of comments about things we should talk about next year keep those come in if
you have ideas Janice said she wants some ideas next spring on how to control
weeds and grass in the garden that don’t involve too many chemicals we can
definitely talk about for sure and then a couple questions I think we can talk
about now Tracy asked how about powdery mildew on nine bark shrubs she’s done
good sanitation clean up around the bushes but every year in late summer
they’re covered in a lot I think you know one just basic cultural practice
for powdery mildew is just pruning to keep the canopy more open more airflow
it’s you know moisture and high humidity that kind of caused it but that’s the
best most practical solution short of spraying a fungicide that would be
recommended for that that’s all I’ve managed it on most of my
plants is just keeping the canopy of that shrub a little more open maybe
there’s a tree that’s shading it a bit that you could let a little more
sunlight in that’ll help to dry it out yeah do you guys have any other
recommendations you know insecticidal soap is labeled and has fungicidal
properties and if you were to maybe spray with some insecticidal soap which
is not a harsh chemical it doesn’t last a long time in the environment it will
get that powdery mildew in the very beginning and then maybe it won’t spread
quite as fast I mean you’re never going to cure a powdery mildew it’s always
going to you know if I sprayed that insecticide
soap on a powdery mildew leaf it would turn brown but I do think youuuu hit one
of the the biggest preventive medicines on the head when you said sanitation
yeah that was that was my number one go-to for powdery mildew throughout my
greenhouse and am i doing in my landscape yeah so if you’re gonna spray
that insecticidal soap that’s early in the season then before you really have
well when you first notice that you’re getting some symptoms that might kill it
out before it starts to spread mm-hmm and there’d be any fungicide – you want
to do it early in the season Yeah right when you notice it because once it’s
once it’s gone one does fall because yeah Ryan will reiterate this is you
know diseases are not cured but prevented and I think a lot of people
like come to us all the time oh my tree has disease what do I do there’s nothing
you can do about it right now you have to wait until next year see if the
temperatures and the environment are going to be conducive to that disease
and then you have to spray a preventative which is why a lot of
people do not you know control diseases in their trees because it can be really
quite intensive difficult but I mean great job on a preventive treatment of
sanitation this year that’s yeah that’s probably the number one Yanis I think
she needs to be teaching this show is Canada yeah I’ll tell you – 9 Burke is a
great cut foliage pruning you can use it in handles first it’s one of my favorite
trial of flowers follow-up question what we’re talking about powdery mildew
Lauren has any bee balm is resistant to powdery mildew there are and I actually
think I have an article on my blog where I talked about powdery mildew and I
talked about can’t remember the exact cultivars yeah I can’t think of it I’ve
pointed out some cultivars of zinnias and bee
that were resistant to powdery mildew not you know a filthy yeah nothing is
ever entirely recite has shown to have more resistance to powdery mildew I
can’t remember the names off my head but I’m sure Aaron will see that blog entry
or yeah we’ll see if we can find that yes if not all we posted after the show
remember that when you talk about that one yeah I think we talked about this
summer possibly cool suggestion for 2020 a pruning demo from Ryan yep from Mary
she said our juniper with blueberries she only uses outside just because of
the odor that they can emit indoors so yeah you can definitely kind of be picky
about which ones use indoors outdoors there’s always pets to consider inside –
yes and some people you know if you’ve never worked with these before some
people can actually be allergic to them so notice I did it without gloves a lot
not very many people do it without gloves you know I’m just used to it and
I like using my hands I smell it can cause a reaction yeah I think we have
somebody in my office that has alerted to juniper and if she can’t work with
the juniper sure yes different things and I was gonna mention this when I
talked about wreaths you know you always get SAP on your hands choose if you’re
not wearing the gloves so if you do that even just soap and water won’t take care
of it cuz it’s just so sticky so you want something that’s alcohol-based
it’ll get it off so most of time whenever I do wreath workshop I bring
along some hand sanitizer because that’ll set I’ll call in there we’ll
just cut through the SAP so if you got missing hands pull up and sanitize it as
an arborist we’d use rubbing alcohol that’s probably pretty abrasive on your
skin women thing if you have an rubbing
alcohol on their hands okay let me go back in think we had another question
here from Laura she said she planted and transplanted some native shrubs and
grasses in October and November she did wild plum coral berry various grasses
mm-hmm how much water do they need now in zone 5b should she be watering those
plant up in October November I mean you still would have water your landscape
until the ground freezes this is the same for trees and maybe you want to do
it once or twice a month the ground it’s gonna freeze really soon probably but
we’ve really had some great precipitation so a minute.i you don’t
really have to water at this point I doubt it’s gonna get drier but if it was
really drought he you would want to water them once or twice you know and
and I probably did similar planting this fall of some native grasses native
shrubs few trees you know the corner of our front yard I really haven’t watered
and it may be a month or more and what I’ve done a few times is kind of dug
into the mulch and felt that root ball of the maybe the smallest plan is what
I’ve picked because that’s probably gonna dry out faster than a larger root
ball just to check the moisture and that was maybe again like a month ago before
we kind of got some of these fall rains but I would say we’re probably just
about good for the year on watering we should expect enough rainfall to kind of
keep it along but you’ll know if it gets dry and if you can just just like you
check the soil conditions on your house plan you can go just check the soil
directly and see what you think great great question okay keep those questions
coming and comments and what you want to hear about next year Michael said it’s
always in need of help with best composting soil many soil amending in
IPM practices we’ve definitely we’ve had a lot of composting questions here this
year so yeah we did discuss that maybe we need a composting expert come
in and write them down because sure cool we’ll keep those coming in the comments
while we wait can I talk about I just did a blog post on sustainable holiday
trees because you know I do a sustainable Thanksgiving dinner every
year and then I thought I could take it a little further and talk about
sustainable trees so one of the things that you know Ryan mentioned the white
pine the disperses these things they’re gonna grow around our area it’s some
it’s the crazy ones that are not going to be grown in the Midwest or even you
know close to Illinois I think loblolly pine was one of them that was just as
something that’s not going to be grown we’re gonna have to source from the west
coast so by the tree that you you you pick out can be helped make it a more
sustainable thing so sustainably because more sustainable because it’s just ship
further and most of the time if these and if you go to a tree farm which is
even more sustainable because you’re supporting an Illinois industry they’re
replacing these trees three to one when you cut them down and those trees
are growing between five and fifteen years before they’re ready for to be
harvested so they are sequestering lots of carbon which is great for the
Illinois landscape and so I love the idea of going to tree farms supporting a
local industry that’s also helping us sequester carbon another thing that I
talked about in this article was you know buying a container tree but you
know the ground hasn’t frozen yet so but you need to make sure you dig
that hole and put that soil in the garage before you know you where you’re
gonna plant it after Christmas but it can be you know even more sustainable
because not only is it something that you can get from the local garden center
but it’s something you can plant right away and that’s gonna ultimately
sequester that more carbon which is what we’re all looking for in trees we want
them to sequester lots of carbon and then another thing is what in this
research for this article it really surprised me guys is the that more and
more people are not buying live Christmas trees and they’re opting for
the artificial trees and the industry just in my local Bloomington area has
dropped drastically I mean they used to sell seven to ten times more trees than
they do now so think about this where is an artificial tree created is it created
in the United States No is it created with chemicals and resources yeah it’s
an artificial tree is not very sustainable and then when you’re done
with that artificial tree where does it go and how long does it stay in the
landfill forever forever so people think they’re being more sustainable by going
for an artificial tree and when actuality you’re more sustainable by
cutting down a tree and putting it in your house so just food for thought but
do what you prefer get a live tree so okay let’s finish it off we had a couple
questions we can answer while we finish off the day but I wanted to show so the
end here how to do a wreath – okay we talked about evergreens all day today –
so we can do containers like Kelly showed earlier you can do
you can do so at ease you know Garland’s there’s so much you can do with with
evergreens but a wreath is a very simple simple thing you can do with evergreens
either you get from the garden center like we talked about or you get from
your own landscape all you need is some type of form to attach your evergreens
to so you can get simple rings like this from craft stores or the wider kind of
just basic green wreath rings they can be square they can be round they can be
any any shape you just need something that we’re gonna attach them to and then
you need wire so like we mentioned earlier this is just basic paddle wire
you can get from the craft store and I went ahead and tied it on to my frame to
get it started because when I make this wreath it’s gonna be one continuous
piece of wire I’m not going to cut it until the end so that’s why you need the
paddle so that you can just wrap around that that spring so first step is to cut
those evergreens so kind of like Kelly did for a container I’ve gone ahead and
cut a couple different types of evergreens here just into smaller pieces
and the size of your pieces is gonna dictate how wide or big your your wreath
is gonna be so if you want kind of a small neat and tidy wreath then keep
your pieces a little smaller if you want something a little bit more big and
organic then go a little bit bigger it just depends what you depends what you
want to do but having like all of the pieces be the same sort of size really
blends well to a pretty wreath yeah yeah you want to keep it consistent whatever
so if you start small stay small if you go big stay with larger pieces so once
you’ve got your pieces cut what you’re gonna do is just make little bundles or
little groupings of the type of evergreens that you want to use and each
of your bundles could be the exact same so you could use a piece of the Fraser
Fir a piece of the noble fir a piece of the the junipers or you can alternate it
it just kind of depends on the look you’re going for so if I got a little
group of fir here a little bunch of juniper and I’m gonna lay that on top of
my wreath frame here where I have that wire attached and I’m just gonna hold it
down and use that paddle to wire around the cut ends nice and tight
that’s the biggest mistake people make is not tight so two to three times
around if you’re doing it nice and tight will be plenty give it a shake if they
fall off you’re not tight enough you want to have a nice tight wrap around
there okay first step make a bundle second step make another one so pick up
this you can again you can repeat the same exact thing the same order this
time I’ll add some cedar in to spice it up okay so you can go with whatever kind
of pattern pattern you like but all your cut ends are bundled in one spot and
then that second group is gonna go on top of the first one not directly on top
you’re scooting it back a little bit so that it covers the cut ends of that
first grouping that’s your whole goal with this with a wreath here is that
every time you’re covering up the cut ends so that when you’re done and you
get all the way back around you shouldn’t see any any cut ends so what
I’ve seen people struggle with is how do it what at what angle do you attach the
next piece to kind of keep moving in a circle so that’s yeah that’s a good
question so I tend to do most of them fairly I guess you would call that what
parallel to the to the wreath frame we’re just a little a little or a little
bit angled outward depends how big you want your wreath to be because if you’re
going pretty angled out you’re gonna have pretty long a pretty long grief and
I think that’s what a lot of folks think is that it needs to stick like out at a
90 degree angle from the circle but that’s right cut a piece like the right
shape of pieces then they’ll lay in whichever direction you you wire them on
there okay so I’m not gonna go all the way around I’ve magically have one
that’s a little farther along from earlier so that’s what you would do is
you would continue doing those bundles all the way around until you get to the
ends and the last one you kind of have to tuck underneath and get your wire
underneath there so you don’t flatten your first grouping and then at the end
you cut off your wire tie it off and that’s it so it’s just a big ring
of little bundles stacked on top of each other and wired on there and then you
can just you know use this wire to add on boughs and pine cones and yep or you
can glue hot glue you can tuck things in like that and then of course you can
always finish it off with a bow at the top the bottom the side wherever your
one into or go without about to one of the things that is different from the
one I make mine I use hangers wire hangers I shape them into a circle and
I’ll put the two of them together and I’ll wire them first with that paddle
wire and then that’s what I use because you know I never had the if you don’t
have a metal ring or something to use and yeah those wire hangers from the dry
cleaner and even the wire hangers are getting harder and harder to that’s true
yeah like the dry cleaners and they’re hard they’re in the last couple of years
I’ve been adding pieces of ribbon to my bundles so the ribbon is all throughout
no it’s you know not you know pristine but it just looks really cool yeah so
pretty simple if you have those evergreens at home and something to wire
them to give it a shot so in any follow-up care after that or I think you
just pretty much hang it up yeah hang it up now obviously like we talked about
the containers if it’s outside it’s gonna last a lot longer because you have
cooler temperatures when you hang it inside it’s gonna smell grades it’s
gonna look great but it will start to get dry and brittle after a couple weeks
and it might start to shed on you especially if it’s on a door where it’s
where it’s moving a lot again misting is not gonna like we talked about it’s
missing he’s not gonna give you a whole lot could you soak it in a kitchen sink
for a little bit you could definitely soak it so weird about it yeah give it
some give it some moisture and if it’s a pot you could always add some water
exactly exactly cool so give that a shot let me see we got a couple questions I
want to make sure we get to those in our last eight minutes here de esta cuestión
are the waterless amaryllis bulbs savable and I think what you’re talking
about di got a couple of last year what it’s an amaryllis bulb
it’s dipped in wax oh yes I see in wax so you don’t actually plant the bulb
it’s already has the flower initiated it’s coated in like a red color so it’s
still waterless I’m assuming that’s what you mean you don’t actually water it
that you enjoy it let it bloom enjoy the thing I actually did peel off the wax
last year and plant it and it did grow so yeah you can’t it as long as the bulb
is still like firm and healthy and it looks good by the time you’re ready to
do that it worked for me so trynna i know ken johnson and i think i did too
did articles on amaryllis how to take care of them yeah so we got lots of info
on the on the website if you need that yeah okay Lauren has she said shoot I
already bought an artificial tree what do I do with it if I want to switch back
to a real tree donate it maybe there’s there’s some places it’ll take donated
donations and then somebody else could or use it for the next 30 years of your
life just keep using thrift stores so you do that redo the lights yeah
absolutely okay question here about sugar maple they have a sugar maple
about 40 years old that on one side about five feet away from the tree
construction has dug up in order to put a sidewalk since then there have been
branches that have died randomly I also have a Green Mountain sugar maple that
was in connected to the construction it too has branches that are dying the tree
is about 20 years old I’m in Illinois zone 5 I’m wondering if this is the norm
for sugar maples I’m wondering if I should hire a tree company to cut away
the dead branches and if it’s too late for these trees so construction well you
know maples have a pretty relative to an oak an oak tree less of a root system so
you know construction is really going to impact that root system and I’ll you
know it really depends to how close it is to the tree you know how much of the
root system is impacted and total from that construction but I don’t think it
necessarily is would spell the end for your
I think it definitely needs some special care in the coming year to answer your
question on the Deadlands yes you absolutely should have those dead limbs
pruned out of the tree probably should think about protecting the rest of the
root system that’s left as best you can so as much as you can possibly stand to
mulch out to the drip line of that tree I’d recommend keeping it watered next
year during that dry time of the year so you know after we hit about June or so
and rain rainfall starts to dry up for the summer think about watering a little
earlier a lot of plants I I don’t think about till maybe July or when it really
starts to get hot doing a lot of watering but I think in this case and
trying to nurse that tree long I would i probably water it at any point I feel
like it’s dry in the summertime you know that that’s really the best thing we can
do that the damage has been done to the root system so there’s not you know true
shade trees really don’t have high nutrient requirements or that’s really
not a case where I would recommend a lot of fertilizer you may get a soil test
just to make sure pH is an awful little and you know and over time that may
change too as they install a sidewalk there’s a lot of calcareous materials
that are you know in the concrete in the you know gravel that’s maybe an under
you know underneath the concrete so that can actually raise pH over time and
treat you know shade trees like a lower pH probably lower than seven so so it
may be worth the soil test just to see if pH is a little off because that that
can sometimes you know strike a balance for the tree but that’s really the best
we can recommend is just trying to minimize any further impact to the roots
so the mulch is going to preserve moisture watering is going to keep the
moisture there that it needs maybe limit the activity under that tree from here
on out even if foot traffic from humans or
animals or anything so I really just need to protect what’s left of that root
zone yeah and just a little bit behind the biology of trees is what happens is
when you start killing off some of the root system is it kind of evens out
throughout the trees so then it starts taking some of the branches out
so it doesn’t necessarily mean that those dead branches doesn’t necessarily
mean death to the tree it just means it’s kind of responding to those
damaging entry area yeah that tree is a system that has to be kind of in
equilibrium so it has to have enough Ridge to support the top growth and
that’s why you see you know sometimes dead limbs pop up on a healthy tree well
that it’s usually an inner shade limb that you know just wasn’t producing
enough photosynthesis that it had the roots to support that that limb that
limb so it’s dropped it off I really probably recommend also in all this to
have a certified arborist take a look at your tree because you can’t beat a
qualified arborist on the ground looking at that and really assessing its health
there may be some other treatments they can recommend there’s growth regulating
hormones for trees that you can actually apply to the soil the root system of the
tree and and what it does is reduces the the it reduces cell chute elongation on
the tree so that energy that the tree would have put in a shootie long Gatien
it’s gonna focus on defense mechanisms and root growth and other things but
that’s something that somebody with a pesticide license would have to apply
for you and it really is a carefully done treatment that had you know there’s
the right time and a place for that but I would really suggest having an
arborist take a look at that tree on the ground it’s well worth your time and
investment in that in that house call yeah excellent questions today everybody
thank you much so much for your awesome questions and comments about what we
should talk about in 2020 if you still have ideas feel free to add them into
the comments even after we’re done being live because we’re gonna do a planning
meeting to talk about next year because this is our last show of the year so we
want to wish everybody happy holidays and a Happy New Year and thank you guys
for joining us this is our second year doing this not full year but yeah yeah
you’re yeah we’re having fun we’re really enjoying it we want to thank you
guys for joining us thank you

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *